Author Topic: Cutlass bearing  (Read 6849 times)

mistress

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Cutlass bearing
« on: August 08, 2011, 02:16:17 PM »
What is the procedure for changing the cutlass bearing on the 323? I understand that it is not the usual method

Dolce_Vita

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Re: Cutlass bearing
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2011, 03:48:21 PM »
Preface:  I haven't done this yet!  It's only what I've read.

As I understand it, the process goes something like this:

- Remove the shaft (an adventure in itself!)
- Insert a hacksaw blade thru the bearing, and use it to saw thru
  the bearing and just barely thru the bearing's shell.
- Press out the now loose bearing
- Pre-chill the new bearing with dry ice to get it to shrink
- Press-fit the new bearing using a section of all-thread,
  some large fender washers, and a couple of nuts.

Under no circumstances do you want to pound on, or put any
force on the strut.
@(^.^)@  Ed
1977 P-323 #42 "Dolce Vita"
with rebuilt Atomic-4

Rusty Pelican

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Re: Cutlass bearing
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2011, 09:51:43 AM »
Done it twice, first time the bearing just wore out.  Two years later the rubber separated from the brass.
Not fun.
The previous post sums up the procedure, except, the P323 strut has a lip on the forward opening, negating the option of simply pressing out the bearing
Tips:  -mark the shaft coupling to ease re-alignment
        -Use a very sharp chisel to fold the brass onto itself. You will not be able to remove the bearing
         untill you break the contact with the shaft. Tap chisel gently with hammer to accomplish this.
        -grind down the lip on the strut, without the lip a jobber can replace the bearing in a flash without removing shaft
        -keep zincs as far forward as possible

Rusty Pelican

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Re: Cutlass bearing
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2011, 09:59:25 AM »
Oops, I should have said
You will not be able to remove the bearing
         untill you break the contact with the STRUT

nickzchef

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Re: Cutlass bearing
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2012, 04:21:34 PM »
I just did one today.  If its not that old you may be able to press it out (after you remove the shaft, and the 2 inset screws) by making a 3/4" threaded bolt press, about 15" long. There are images online.  If you must cut use a very sharp hacksaw and cut just right below your inset screw holes.  Once cut, you can screw in two bolts through these inset holes and push the bearing inward to collapse by ratcheting on it, perhaps avoiding pounding on the unit and damaging your strut. If you must pound use something softer than the strut metal, really hard maple, etc.

I iced my bearing and then measured with a micro meter, t'was exactly the same size as when I started. I even sprayed Co2 (chewing gum remover) to further chill it. Still no shrinkage, don't waste your time.  You cannot get these extremely cold anyway, as they can become brittle and shatter if not aligned properly when pressing in (use the same press you made). I used a small bar of soap and coated the bearing and the outside wall. Slipped right in with my overly strong press.  Piece of cake.