Author Topic: Tips on Initial Inspection  (Read 1508 times)

SaltyDog

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  • Vessel Name: Windancer
  • City: Mystic Island
  • State: NJ
Tips on Initial Inspection
« on: June 13, 2023, 02:09:42 PM »
Hello all,

Prospective new owner here.  I'm looking at a lovely and, from the photos the current owner has sent, very well cared for 323.  The current owner, retired electrical engineer, has owned it for something like 30+ years. 

I'm looking at it next week and would like to know what in particular to look for.  It's on the hard and has been for two seasons I believe. 

My sailing background goes back to my Boy Scout days in the 1970's learning how to sail on a Sunfish on a lake then later on in my teen years a daysailer in the Barnegat Bay in NJ.  I haven't sailed in probably four decades though so I've made plans to take ASA classes after deciding on a boat.  I've been lucky enough to buy a house on The Great Bay on a deep lagoon so she'll live tied to the dock in the back yard.  Bonus is that I'm nearly on the bay so no bridges.  Been power boating the last two years.  The cabin boat is going to make dock space for the Pearson.

I looked at a Pearson 53 foot yawl the other day.  The hull was aces but the interior was a bit tired.  Had a great inventory of sails though. 

I'll post pics if/when I get her.

Any advice or tips would be greatly appreciated.

Mike
"If it floats it gets a 10" Capt Q

Dolce_Vita

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Re: Tips on Initial Inspection
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2023, 01:28:18 PM »
Hi Mike.

Examine the base of the mast for corrosion.  Pearson used a mild steel mast step. This, in contact with an aluminum mast in a damp bilge, tended to rot away the base of the mast.  The fix is to pull the mast, cut off the corroded part (usually around 4"), and have a new mast step built out of aluminum or G10 to avoid corrosion.  Allow ~$750 - $1000

Pull the access plates and examine all the chainplates for signs of leaking or rusty stains. Several early 323's have had chain plates snap due to crevice corrosion.  The good news is that they are all straight flat bar stock, and easy to have replacements fabricated. I was able to get them fab'ed from 316 SS for around $100 ea.

Good luck!  The 323 is a fine choice.  We've had ours for 13 years and love it.   
@(^.^)@  Ed
1977 P-323 #42 "Dolce Vita"
with rebuilt Atomic-4