Author Topic: Refinishing the bright work  (Read 5294 times)

ARICHE

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Refinishing the bright work
« on: March 10, 2012, 06:04:20 PM »
When we purchased our 323 all the bright work had been cover over with a Cabots mustard colored stain that looked fair at the time. Two seasons later it was leaching oil and collecting mold... Ugh!

In the summer of 2009 I began hand sanding and scraping the cockpit combing and was happy to just apply teak oil to the exposed wood and see the grain come through. This was the only the beginning.

Last spring I took a hand belt sander with 8o grit paper and stripped the messy mustard off and then fine sanded it with 150.  It was a 7 hour process.  Hateful, nasty, and exhausting, but the gods said it had to be done...
I then applied three coast of Silkins Ceatol after wiping the whole area with Acetone (gloves and respirator included) and it came out beautiful.  I did miss some bits of stain that had become embedded into the teak, but oh my what a difference.  I have heard worrisome words about Ceatol, but I am very happy.  This year I will scour all the brightwork with a nylon brush and detergent, rinse and apply one coat of Ceatol and should be good to go!
We do have a cooler climate and paint and varnish will hold up better than down south.

I also built new slides in three pieces for the main hatch entrance.  Love that too.

ARICHE is very happy with the work as she has demonstrated so many time last summer. When I stood on the rocky shore of Jewell Island admiring her I could really see a feeling of contentment on her part at anchor.  She is a player, but really does like to be dressed up for the occasion.
Here are a few pics.
Take care and i hope you all the very best and safe voyages this spring, summer and fall.

Paul McDonough
Hull #100

Blue Heron

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Re: Refinishing the bright work
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2012, 10:01:26 PM »
Hi Paul,

Very nice job on the brightwork! It sounds like a lot of work, and that is going to be my next big project as far as cosmetics...I just hope I can get similar results. That Cetol looks great!!!

I am very interested in how you made your 3 piece hatch board. Thieves broke into our boat and shattered the one piece plexiglass board that was on Blue Heron, and I would like to make a 3 piece board to replace it. Did you just take two cuts on the big board at an angle? Or was there some router work involved? Any detail would be appreciated.

Thanks,

chet

Bill1188

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Re: Refinishing the bright work
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2014, 09:58:12 PM »
When using Sikkens, understand that subsequent coats.really darken. Go with the new clear they sell for multiple coats.

selene

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Re: Refinishing the bright work
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2014, 05:19:41 PM »
Nice job on Archie!  I have been using Cetol for a number of years now.  For me, the base coat is Cetol Natural Teak (about 2-3 layers).  Top coat is Cetol clear, renewed every year. Works well.  Incidentally, I did have to replace a section due to an unfortunate case of spring-line rub in a busy harbor, and was pleased that it came off easy, without sanding - a relief as my teak is getting mighty thin!

I know there are many varnish purists out there, and there is no doubt to my mind that varnish is a superior finish - but I am a great believer in the 80/20 rule.  With Cetol you get 80% of the finish for 20% of the effort.  So if you can afford the time - or pay somebody else - to sand and revarnish with multiple coats of varnish at least twice a year, go for it!  Otherwise, Cetol works well...

BTW, I do use varnish down below.

Regarding the splash boards, it is traditional to make a ~45degree cut, outboard=down, inboard=up, to ensure and water splashed on the boars drips outwards into the cockpit, instead of inwards to the companionway. 

Personally I have two slides; a large, single piece (which I faced with teak veneer) and a perspex 2-piece.

Now or Never!

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Re: Refinishing the bright work
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2014, 06:21:28 PM »
I've been the varnish route==several times.  First, I tried Epiphanes.  Then I tried Cetol Clear (ugh!  not really clear). Next, I went with Awlgrip varnish.  None of them gave good, lasting results.  All of them required attention every  months or so.  Cetol was no easier to apply than any of the rest and resulted in a muddy, pinkish cast.  I am now sold on Awlgrip AwlBrite.  Itis a 3 part Urethane finish that is absolutely clear and provides a brilliant finish.  Easy to apply, no sanding between coats except to correct minor flaws.  I sand between coats every two or three coats.  It applies to a varnished surface.  I put down 3 coats of Awlgrip varnish, no sanding btween coats.  Then about 6 coats of Awlbrite.  It lasts for at least two years (I know from experience) but benefits from a couple of additional coats once a year.  No more varnish for me.