Author Topic: Chain plate removal and inspection  (Read 4079 times)

Eddy

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Chain plate removal and inspection
« on: January 23, 2012, 12:10:41 PM »
I got my survey back and the one item on the list that he indicated needed immediate attention was to pull the chainplates and inspect/rebed them. While we were doing the survey he said I could pull one at a time and use one of the halyzrds to hold tension while I did that. Has anyone else done this? What should I attach the halyard to? Any info appreciated, thanks.

Now or Never!

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Re: Chain plate removal and inspection
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2012, 04:32:05 PM »
Interesting that this subject should come up.  I recently met another 323 owner who recommended this inspection.  He had a chainplate fail.  Obviously you can see the chainplate above the deck and below but you cannot see it where is passes through the deck.  If there is going to be any corrosion, that is where it will occur.  I plan to inspect them as soon as I return from my winter cruise.  As long as you remove the chainplates one at a time, I don't think it would be necessary to provide any kind of temporary support.

Eddy

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Re: Chain plate removal and inspection
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2012, 12:26:41 PM »
I pulled, cleaned, inspected, rebed, intalled all 6 plates. I found all 3 on the port side leaking and the forward plate on the starboard side leaking. All of the plates that had been leaking had a good amount of corrosion on the cover plate that covers the entry on the deck. All of the plates showed very minor pitting and a very slight amount of wear at the top of the hole where the rigging attaches. I didn't see anything that warranted replacement at this time. I am going to make up a replacement set of plates as well as covers. The factory covers are 1/8" aluminum, I'm going to make a set out of 316 SS to replace them with. There was some rot in the coring but nothing terrible I think I got to this in time. I took pictures of the plates with the interior panels removed but I can't find them now. I didn't support the mast I just pulled each one individually after talking to a local rigger.

T_schlueter

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Re: Chain plate removal and inspection
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2020, 04:50:35 PM »
I just looked closely at a chainplate and it appeared the trim piece was welded to the chainplate. You picture indicates otherwise. Maybe I can rebed without removing the chainplate. Yes?
New owner of "project boat"

selene

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Re: Chain plate removal and inspection
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2020, 05:46:36 PM »
I recently replaced all my chainplates (7, not the stem fitting); after 40 years, I thought it time, even though the old ones appeared to be in good shape.  I got new ones made by Garhauer at a very reasonable price.

After pulling the chainplates - using halyards to help support the mast, 'cos I am chicken - I removed ~1/4" of balsa core in each slot, and filled the gap with thickened epoxy, so as to seal the core - now even if the chainplates leak the core will be kept dry. I then put in a small chanfer/bevel around each slot to improve the bedding efficiency (acting like a small o-ring, in theory)

The covers, as others have reported, are aluminium, and were pitted but functional. I cleaned off surface corrosion and reinstalled them, using butyl tape to bed things down.

So far no leaks. But it was surprising to me how much the hull relaxed without shrouds; it needed a couple of weeks to get the tension right!

Rusty Pelican

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Re: Chain plate removal and inspection
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2020, 08:28:41 AM »
What year is your P323?

selene

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Re: Chain plate removal and inspection
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2020, 04:55:57 PM »
Not sure who the question was directed to...mine is 1980 (#212).

Alma

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Re: Chain plate removal and inspection
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2020, 11:54:49 AM »
We sail every weekend in the ocean 7 months for 25 years now in our 323.

We still have the original chainplates (and all standing rigging) and I'm confident they are as good or better than what is available today. The key is keeping the water out of the transition from the chainplate into the hull. If you have had water intrusion you can usually see rust trails from the chainplates when viewed in the head behind the vanity sink in the compartment where the chainplates are attached to the hull's knees. It is little effort to inspect all the shrouds behind the deco covers in the salon as well. The backstay is accessed through the round plate behind the helm.

If you want to be safe and save money you'll need to learn to be better than a so-called 'marine surveyor'.

It would be foolish and dangerous to tell someone to ignore a 'surveyor's' advice to inspect or replace chainplates. Yet-

Most surveyors are just watchdogs for the insurance industry and when I got my pricy survey required to insure ALMA 25 years ago- I was little surprised to see in my multi-page report that ALMA's DIESEL Generator was in "tip top" shape...

ALMA has a gasoline powered Atomic Four and no DIESEL anything on board-

That glaring mistake is typical of surveys. A little tap-tap on the hull and a cursory look at the pumps and you write a check and get false security.

So realize chainplates can last a very long time when kept completely D R Y !!!

I did this by cleaning up the original aluminum plates the chainplates travel through into the deck and the chainplates with a Dremel tool and then applied BOX-STORE clear silicone to the joint fairing the silicone to follow the chainplate up 3/8" so water will fall away and not pool around the joint. This also makes the silicone bedding stronger since it wraps around the chainplate and transitions onto the aluminum plate.

Be sure to clean everything with acetone before applying the silicone and do not disturb until it sets up.

23 years and counting...

Always check the pins that attach the shrouds and stays to the chainplates- that is the wear point and must be inspected every couple of years. The pins can wear invisibly and also develop stress riser cracks that can ruin a weekend...