Author Topic: Stuffing Box Hose Question  (Read 570 times)

Chance

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Stuffing Box Hose Question
« on: March 17, 2018, 11:30:17 PM »
Has anyone replace their stuffing-box hose ?  Chance has the  original hose at 41 years . It looks fine and feel okay but not sure if might be a problem underneath the hose .  Fresh water Lake Michigan 6 months in and 6 months on the hard.   

Bob Kraus

Chance

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Re: Stuffing Box Hose Question
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2018, 09:57:30 PM »
Any advice on removal and replacing a cutless bearing on pearson 323 . What size and brand to buy?                                        Bob K Chance

Alma

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Re: Stuffing Box Hose Question
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2018, 12:25:57 PM »
Now is the time to purchase the PYI dripless stuffing box kit.

I installed one 20 years ago and it is great.

PYI recommends replacing the rubber bellows every three years. I didn't know that and had no problems for 12 years.

 I replaced the old one and kept as a spare since it is still perfect.

Be sure to file a slight chamfer on the end of your prop shaft so as not to nick the o-rings upon installation.

One other note- When I bought mine I chintzed-out and bought a model without a vent.
At that time there was a 'low RPM' version that did not need pressurized water cooling.

The only problem is dying sea life creates a bubble of gas that builds up when the boat sits.
If the bellows is not 'burped' it my get hot. I never suffered a failure but I did get the kit hotter than I like once.

Now I simply remember to burp the bellows when I check the engine before startup.

The modern version has a vent tube so this isn't an issue-

You will be very pleased with the PYI dripless kit. No water ever.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2018, 12:27:40 PM by Alma »
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selene

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Re: Stuffing Box Hose Question
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2018, 01:59:40 PM »
I second the vote for the dripless seal.  A little burping every now and then is all you need to do.

However, when you install it, make sure you add a collar behind the rotor - a good article about installing the PSS seal is here, and it refers to the collar:
http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/pss_shaft_seal

The rotor itself is held onto the shaft with two small set-screws.  If these lose their grip - which happened to me - the rotor can slip, and water will come in. It will take 3-5 minutes to reach the cabin sole...a collar is cheap insurance, quick and easy to fit.  Most boatyards do this without being asked; as I discovered, not all...

Apart from that heart-stopping moment - which also reinforced the need to do a quick overall boat-check before leaving her - the PSS has kept my bilge dry for many years.

Alma

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Re: Stuffing Box Hose Question
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2018, 11:00:09 PM »
Yes I like that website too. Lots of good information about a lot of things. An additional clamp can't hurt for sure. A zinc anode could do double duty as the safety collar. I've often thought of the rotor itself as a clamp to prevent the prop shaft from flailing around if the coupling comes loose. I never thought the rotor would need a backup. It surly can't hurt.
And an additional zinc (aluminum) anode backing up the rotor just might come in handy one day...
If you're sailing past Cape May give us a shout-out!

Valor

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Re: Stuffing Box Hose Question
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2018, 08:53:59 AM »
Perfect timing. I am actually purchasing a PSS this weekend. My boat was repowered from an Atomic A4 to a Yanmar, and they had to rework the engine beds to make it work. As a result, it was impossible to adjust the stuffing box. 

Quick question. I did not remove my current stuffing box as of yet. For a 1 1/8th inch shaft, I think there are 4 choices for the stern tube hose diameter. 2 1/4 is the largest. I put a micrometer on the base of the stern tube that was exposed and its reading 2.40.  .40 is slightly bigger then a quarter and smaller then a 1/2 .I'm hoping the base of the stern tube may be a little thicker because of the way the fiberglass was layered up.

For those of you that have purchase this, do you remember the size of the stern tube? I'm going with the 2 1/4 as of now. Thanks!

Michael
Michael M

Valor

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Re: Stuffing Box Hose Question
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2018, 09:54:55 AM »
FYI- Defender has the 1 1/8th x 2 1/4 PSS on sale right now for $182.39 until Sunday. That's almost 65 bucks off the reg price. The other shaft sizes are pretty much the same price. Now is the best time to get one.

Mike
Michael M

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Re: Stuffing Box Hose Question
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2018, 09:55:57 PM »
I replaced my stuffing box hose maybe five years ago.  I used a Buck Algonquin hose.  The toughest part was getting the prop shaft out.  Penetrating oil and patience are required.  I did not go with a dripless stuffing box.  I like things simple.  Repacking is, IMHO, easy to maintain and risk free from a catastrophic failure.

I sail Lake Michigan too.